One of the best features we like about Allstate's auto insurance is their network of agents. They're well-versed in the various auto insurance coverage types as well as Allstate's features and benefits. With over 20,000 sales representatives, and 9,300 agencies across the United States, there is sure to be an agent within driving distance. We also like that Allstate has added a number of thoughtful components to their policies with their customers in mind. For example, Allstate offers a Claim Satisfaction Guarantee for any policyholder unhappy with their claims payout or experience. They also offer accident forgiveness and safe driving bonuses as optional features. All in all, we recommend that drivers who prefer in-person interactions consider Allstate as their car insurance company.


Many insurers state that their policies offer ‘full coverage’ without detailing what that means, because, well, it doesn’t really mean anything. According to Jonathan O’Steen, personal injury attorney and partner at O’Steen & Harrison LLC, “Some insurance agents use ‘full coverage’ as a shorthand way to describe auto policies that only meet state minimum limits for coverage. True full coverage would provide unlimited protection for all losses arising from an automobile accident.”
[1] Availability varies. Enrollment discount applies during data collection; final discount is calculated on driving behavior and could be zero. Discounts do not apply to all coverage elements; actual savings vary by state, coverage selections, rating factors and policy changes. Final discount applies at the next policy renewal and remains until drivers or vehicles on the policy change.

I was with Liberty Mutual for about 15 years and was very satisfied with their prices and service, although I never filed a claim. When I retired and moved from California to Florida, my auto rate went up a ridiculous amount, to almost $10,000 a year even though I had no accidents and one minor moving violation in the last ten years. On top of that, Liberty Mutual screwed up my umbrella policy and told me it was “unenforceable,” whatever that means, but I had to pay for the policy anyway up to the time I canceled and switched to Progressive, which cost about one third the cost of Liberty Mutual for an identical policy. Even good companies change over time.
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