Comprehensive coverage: This covers things that could happen to your car not related to an accident that might not be covered by standard insurance, such as weather damage, running into an animal or other factors. It’s a good idea to opt for comprehensive coverage if you can afford it, but it can get costly and might not be worth it if you drive an old or inexpensive car.
In conclusion, the best auto insurance depends on a number of factors: the value of your assets, how much risk you're comfortable with, and what protection you want. You should buy as much coverage as need to make sure your assets are protected in the case of an accident, or other incident. If it's more important to you to get the cheapest protection, then just bear in mind that your assets can be put at risk.
"Many companies offer discounts for good grades and for completion of an approved driver’s education or defensive driving course," continued Doreen Haughton-James of 123 Drive! Driving Academy. "Some also have their own discount programs. State Farm, for example, has a program called 'Steer Clear' where students receive discounts for logging driving hours and completing a program."
Basically, collision coverage covers damages after your car crashes into something - such as a car or stationary object. Comprehensive (also known as OTC) coverage is everything else: Mother Nature, and acts of God, to thefts and vandalism (more info). Comprehensive and collision get bundled together, and pay for repairs or replacements up to the car’s current cash value (car's market value - salvage value).
Progressive offers a unique discount through a program called Snapshot, a usage-based insurance plan that transmits real driving data to the company. Using a telematic device installed in your vehicle, Snapshot monitors your driving behaviors — such as how rapidly you accelerate or how often you stop abruptly — as well as the miles and times you drive, which can increase your risk of an accident.
Keep an eye on your credit score: Maintaining a solid credit score is recommended no matter what, but it’s especially important when your score is being referenced to develop your auto insurance policy. Just as you investigate a car’s accident history before purchasing, insurers in most states use a credit-based insurance score to help determine rates. The higher the risk, the higher the policy costs.
While the above is the lowest amount of insurance coverage you can have, you should consider adding more if you have more to lose. For example, we typically advise drivers to match their liability coverage to what they have in total assets. If you own a house in one of the most expensive zip codes in California, Atherton, and have sizable savings and investment accounts, we'd recommend you increase your liability limits and consider adding umbrella coverage on top. On the other hand, if you're a first-year student at UCLA, you may be fine with liability limits that are closer to the minimum.
Now as to Hartford, I have had them for years and claims for uninured motorist on my car ins and for storm damage on my roof due to large hail. Both claims settled satisfactorily. Cost to the company will never be recovered thru cost of my policies. Also policy cost is in line with other large companies but defiantly not cheap. I just received a quote from Liberty Mutual on my car insurance $400 less that Hartford. However the agent seemed reluctant to send me the quote via email. I thought this strange since I wanted to verify the coverage was he same as I have, he said I just reviewed the coverage (via phone call) to which I replied I didn’t record the conversation so please send me an email detailing the cost and coverage, He stated he would but that was a couple hours age and still haven’ heard back. Go figure.
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