The General also has some red flags when it comes to its financial solvency. While A.M. Best awards an “Excellent” financial strength rating to The General's parent company, American Family Insurance, The General itself isn't rated by agencies like like S&P Global and Moody’s. In fact, it has no ratings of its own — from any agency. The Insurance Information Institute recommends choosing providers with multiple financial strength evaluations, so this complete lack of evaluation gave us pause. While The General may still have the ability to pay out on claims, it isn’t backed with the same confidence as companies with many financial strength ratings.
I've dealt with them on two homeowner claims (for my grandmother) and three auto claims (a $68k uninsured motorist claim and a broken windshield claim on my cars and my mom's car after she hit a deer). These claims have spanned the last nine years and each one was handled with a high level of professionalism, but also with decency, kindness and compassion. They are truly an honest company that pays the claims they owe quickly and fairly. When I was injured by the uninsured motorist in 2010, the first thing my attorney said when he saw that I had A-O was "you have nothing to worry about, they will take care of you."
The General provides insurance for high-risk drivers. If you have a hard time finding coverage elsewhere, just being able to obtain insurance may be a big draw. But the cost of such insurance can be steep — and we don’t just mean premiums. Insufficient coverage means that you might end up paying extra for accidents that you’re involved in, not only to cover costs for expenses like medical bills or property damage, but also because The General may not pay out as much as you need for repairs or claims.

I have had car insurance for a year with The General. I was involved in an accident where another vehicle ran me off the road. The police could not determine what exactly happened but I was not charged with anything. The General would not file my claim as uninsured motorist, which I can kind of understand but they are now refusing to pay my medical bills as well. Is this even legal? Don't they have to cover my medical expenses?
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I have been with Geico for 10 years, what kept me with them is that my daughter had just graduated high school and started college she asked to borrow the car because she was late for school, I said yes she got into a fender bender. Geico paid the claim and they even asked its my choice to add my daughter to my policy or not. Insurance only went up by $30 dollars a month.
The underinsured motorist coverage works similarly, but it would only pay out when you get hit by someone who does have auto insurance, but your bodily injury damages that they caused are more than they carry, leaving them underinsured. Just like your bodily injury, the UMPD would pay to fix the damage to your car caused by the other driver, and you only have to pay the $250 deductible.
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